Q & A

Q.  How long is one session?

Initial treatment will last between 60 and 90 minutes, depending on the depth of the problem, severity of your issue and type of each treatments. Each person is unique with an individualized treatment plan depending on your condition and your physical state.



Q.  Is acupuncture covered by insurance?

The good news is that yes, many insurance companies now offer policies that cover acupuncture and related services performed by an acupuncturist.


Q.  Does my insurance cover acupuncture?

You can find out if your insurance provides acupuncture benefits by calling your insurance company's patient information or benefits line. This number can be found on your insurance card.
If your insurance provider does cover acupuncture, here are a few questions that you can ask to determine your eligibility and coverage:

How many treatments do I get?
How much does the insurance company pay?
What is the normal co-pay for acupuncture from a preferred provider? (This is the amount you would pay out-of-pocket for each visit to a practitioner on their provider list.)
What percentage will I pay for out-of-network practitioners? (This is the amount you would pay out-of-pocket for each visit to a practitioner who is NOT on their provider list.)

Who must provide the acupuncture?
Will I need a referral from an MD to see the acupuncturist?

What is my deductible?
What conditions are covered for acupuncture? (Many plans only cover the treatment of pain)


Q.  Do Medicaid and Medicare cover acupuncture?

At this time, Medicaid and Medicare do not provide coverage for acupuncture. The California MediCal program offers limited coverage when you see an acupuncturist that is a MediCal provider.

 Q.  Is acupuncture a treatment option after a car accident?

If you have suffered a personal injury in an auto or motor vehicle accident, your or the other parties car insurance will pay for acupuncture treatments.

Q.  How do I bill the insurance companies for acupuncture?

While more and more acupuncturists are signing up to become acupuncture providers for insurance companies and handle all the paper work involved in billing, it is common for practitioners to be paid in full and provide patients with the information they will need to file a claim for reimbursement themselves.


Q.  How did acupuncture become popular in the USA?

James Reston, who worked for the New York Times had his appendix removed (appendectomy) during a visit to China in 1971. After surgery he experienced some discomfort and was treated for this with acupuncture. He was surprised to find that the acupuncture treatment helped his discomfort tremendously. He subsequently wrote an article that year titled "Now, About My Operation in Peking". Many believe this article triggered intense interest in acupuncture in the USA. Reston wrote that the acupuncturist "inserted three long, thin needles into the outer part of my right elbow and below my knees and manipulated them...That sent ripples of pain racing through my limbs and, at least, had the effect of diverting my attention from the distress in my stomach. Meanwhile, Doctor Li lit two pieces of an herb called ai, which looked like the burning stumps of a broken cheap cigar, and held them close to my abdomen while occasionally twirling the needles into action. All of this took about 20 minutes, during which I remembered thinking that it was rather a complicated way to get rid of gas... but there was a noticeable relaxation of the pressure and distension within an hour and no recurrence of the problem thereafter.".